One year ago I posted The Reboot announcing my return to JASE Health where I detailed the kind of work we offered, and what the past 12 months would bring for the company. Now it’s time to reflect on those predictions. I’ll share our progress from the past year and look forward on what’s next to come.

Busy 
JASE Health delivered on 76 different projects over the last 12 months. Those projects involved 16 different resources and tens of thousands of hours providing professional services work. This propels JASE ahead of where we were before my 5-year hiatus began in 2014.

 

Market Success
Our pipeline remains strong with $1.9M in work quoted as of writing this update. The market demand remains strong for vendors needing to launch their solutions in both patient and user context from electronic medical record (EMR) systems to become part of the overall workflow. I feel great about the current trajectory and amount of business that remains in the market. The market looks strong for many years to come.

 

New Year, New Company
Earlier this year, I, along with two of my business partners, Sara O’Sullivan and Adam Frederick, formed a new company, JASE Health Solutions, that focuses on developing software applications to address many issues that continue in the industry. We have co-development partnerships with a few health systems where we’re able to prove out our technology and work closely to pilot software. More details to come later this year, but we are very excited to launch the first of many software applications we will offer.

 

Barriers in Healthcare
After spending the last 22+ years in health care and watching several companies struggle with bringing their user experience closer to clinicians in their native workflow, it is clear the companies that flourish are the ones successfully navigating the complicated politics in healthcare. As I’ve said many times, technology is not the barrier in healthcare; it is people and policy. And since people draft and write policy, it is in fact 100% people (and companies) who are the barrier. I’ve been part of initiatives attempting to solve this barrier by offering technology that enabled innovative companies to develop software solutions that completely outmatches everyone around them. However, that rarely happens. As it turns out, if you build it…they may not come (at least not the way you think they would). Technology alone is not nearly enough; it requires a healthy investment in human capital to make the technology adoptable.

 

“Middle Out” Approach
How do we combat the barriers mentioned above? Our team has decided to take our core competency, which is seamless and secure EMR integration, and develop our own software solutions. I like describing our approach as “middle out,” in terms of taking our core competency (in the middleware), enabling third-party vendors to seamlessly integrate, and developing from the middle -> out. In this case, the “out” is JASE moving from the middle tier to the application layer.

Conclusion
What most, if not all, healthcare vendors struggle with today is getting their applications to seamlessly integrate with EMR systems. Developing sound integrated solutions is where JASE Health thrives along with our strong clinical workflow expertise. So, the theory is this: What if we develop software applications where we get the user experience and workflow correct and can seamlessly integrate with EMR systems without needing help from others?

Well, we should have a winner. Now it’s time to get busy. More to come certainly as we get organized…